Queen Bey’s iconic 2018 Coachella performance was unforgettable, and her recent documentary gives us an even more in-depth look into the work that went into it. The behind-the-scenes feature Homecoming, which was released on Netflix on April 17, sheds light on the drastic measures Beyoncé took to get her body ready for the concert. And some of her habits toed the line between healthy and extreme.

In the film, Beyoncé gives fans a close-up look at how she got in shape for the big performance, which took place almost a year after she gave birth to twins Rumi and Sir Carter in June 2017. Bey revealed that just before her C-section, she weighed 218 pounds.

RELATED: How to Do 5 Beyoncé-Inspired Dance Moves

"In order for me to meet my goals, I’m limiting myself to no bread, no carbs, no sugar, no dairy, no meat, no fish, no alcohol—and I’m hungry," she says in the documentary. "I had to rebuild my body from cut muscles. What people don't see is the sacrifice."

While it appears that the superstar’s method was effective, we wanted to know, is it really healthy to eliminate so many food groups at once?

“There are so many things wrong with this,” Keri Gans, RDN, tells Health. “The first is the message of restriction in order to lose weight. I really wish these celebrities would stop repeating this message, it’s all too familiar. One does not need to be on a restrictive diet in order to be at a healthy body weight.”

Gans adds that some of the foods Beyoncé claimed to have eliminated (such as bread and dairy) actually have nutritional benefits that are vital to a well-rounded diet.

RELATED: Should You Try Beyoncé's Greenprint Diet?

“There’s a lot of research that will say that a diet high in whole grains—100% whole grains—can help reduce heart disease and may help reduce cholesterol levels,” Gans says. “And why would you eliminate dairy? That has calcium and vitamin D. And yogurt? That has probiotics.”

Because Beyoncé didn’t go into further detail on her extreme diet, Gans says that it’s hard to tell exactly what foods she was cutting out. But she adds that anyone looking to lose weight should consult a registered dietitian or nutritionist before eliminating foods to ensure all nutrient requirements are being met.

“If you’re looking to lose weight, you will lose weight if you eliminate food groups,” Gans says. “But what I can also promise you is that when you start including these foods you enjoy back into your diet, you’re going to gain your weight back. All you have learned is how to eliminate a food, not how to eat a food in a healthy way.”

RELATED: Beyoncé Reveals She Had an Emergency C-Section. Here's What the Procedure Really Does to Your Body

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After six years in a happy relationship, Mary Jane O’Toole thought a proposal might be on the way. But life with her boyfriend, Alex, hadn’t been good for her eating habits.

Although O’Toole had grown up overweight, she had become “clinically obese” from fast food dinners and a lack of exercise.

“I didn’t really understand how to eat properly,” O’Toole tells PEOPLE. “I never ate because I was hungry — it was because it smelled or looked good, or because my friends were going to Steak n’ Shake or Taco Bell. Then when I met my husband, he had always been active and thought that as long as he worked out he could eat whatever he wanted, and I started to do that too, but I was never active. We just ballooned up.”

RELATED: No Crash Diets or Crazy Restrictions: How This Woman Lost 80 Lbs. with Small Changes

Her extra weight — which hit 281 lbs. that year — was causing health problems that the Orlando-based leasing assistant tried to ignore.

“I didn’t realize that my weight had caused me so much pain,” she admits. “I was in my cousin’s wedding and one of those group dance songs came on and I tried to get low and my knees would hurt. I thought I was getting arthritis — I always had some excuse in my head — but it was just because my knees couldn’t bear the weight of my body.”

Deep down, O’Toole knew that she needed to make a change — as did her husband-to-be, Alex, but it wasn’t until she saw photos from a trip to the Animal Kingdom at DisneyWorld that they found their motivation.

“When we got home they sent us the photos and I was mortified,” she says. “I couldn’t believe how big I had become. We didn’t even recognize ourselves.”

RELATED: 5 Simple Ways to Lose Belly Fat

Together, the couple set weight loss goals and downloaded the app LoseIt!, where users can log their meals, track their calories and monitor their weight loss.

“We had tried using it before and stopped, but seeing those photos was the catalyst we really needed,” she says.

RELATED: 7 Ways to Get Slim Without a Diet

Plus, O’Toole wanted the wedding dress of her dreams.

“I didn’t want to buy a plus-size wedding dress, because they cost way more than straight sizes,” she says. “I was tired of having to buy clothes that were only at certain stores. I felt like I was paying this fat tax — I didn’t have the ability to buy affordable clothes because I was bigger.”

O’Toole was wary of making drastic changes that wouldn’t stick, so they started out slowly.

“I strategically planned my meals to get the maximum calories. It became a game to me,” she says. “I got smarter about it out of a pure desire to eat more food.”

RELATED: What Exactly Is Metabolism—and Can You Speed Yours Up?

And it worked — O’Toole dropped 75 lbs. in a year, and Alex hit his weight loss goal. After those first 12 months, they started to integrate exercise into their daily routine, something that O’Toole had never done before. Six months later, with three days of strength training and two days of yoga a week, she was 100 lbs. down.

“The day that I hit 100 lbs. lost was amazing,” she says. “ When I was 16 I weighed in at 170, and stayed there for a while before gaining it rapidly. So to get under that number, I was freaking out. I actually celebrated by going to the gym, because I had so much energy.”

O’Toole reached her current weight, 146 lbs., a few months later, and ended up with a wedding dress — a size six, her first time in the single digits in her adult life — that she never thought she could wear.

RELATED: This Woman Looks Like She Lost Weight, but She Actually Gained 25 Pounds—Here’s How

“The ideal dress that I had in my head was cleavage-baring with a dramatic accent, and then I went with a long-sleeved dress that went up to my neck with a bare back. I had never pictured something fitted, but I felt awesome in it because I had done it and lost the weight,” she says. Walking down the stairs that led to the aisle was very satisfying, because I knew there were people there who hadn’t seen me since I was much bigger. It was this dramatic moment.”

O’Toole’s original weight loss goal was to hit 135 lbs., but she’s since realized that it may not be possible for her body.

“It’s been a little frustrating to find that I can’t break out of the 140s, but what I’m learning about my body now is that your goals will constantly change, because your body is changing,” she says. “Muscle weighs more than fat, and I just need to be conscious of the fact that I’m going to weigh more but it’s better for my body.”

RELATED: Meet the Woman Who Went From a Size 24 to a 12 in Less Than a Year

She also discovered that her significant weight loss — 135 lbs. in total — left her with excess skin.

“I can pick up the skin on my stomach and my legs,” she says. “I thought bathing suit shopping was going to be this amazing experience, but it’s just as traumatizing. There’s a part of me that wants to get skin removal surgery, but the idea of the drains freak me out. And I am very body positive, so I need to learn to love the body that I’m in. I’ve accomplished this incredible goal and I need to be proud of it.”

Instead of focusing on the number on the scale, O’Toole is making the point to celebrate her “non-scale victories.”

“The biggest one is being able to shop out of my friends’ closets — I had never been able to do that before,” she says. It’s so cool, it’s like I have double the closets, and what I had always dreamt about doing in high school!”

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Lemon belongs to the group of citrus fruits, which includes orange, tangerine, grapefruit, etc. Especially useful when it comes to your health. This yellow fruit contains not only vitamin C but also other vitamins (vitamin B, riboflavin) and minerals such as potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium. The composition of the lemon also includes proteins and carbohydrates.

Lemon has been used since ancient times because of its power to heal.
The lemon peel is very useful because it is rich in vitamin P and phytochemicals, which destroy microbes. The peel contains essential oils that are useful for normalizing blood pressure, lowering cholesterol levels, preventing atherosclerosis, strengthening the immune system, headache, nausea, exhaustion, improving memory and concentration.

How To Grow An Endless Supply Of Lemons Right At Home

We all know about the benefits of consuming lemon or its peel, but often lemons found on markets and super markets, in the cultivation phase, are sprayed with various chemicals for protection, and sometimes they are waxed during transportation. That’s why it’s best at home to grow lemon tree and take advantage of its benefits.

Lemon is a small tree with a height of about 3 to 6 meters and with violet flowers.

Sometimes this tree is cultivated as an ornamental, but most often for its fruits. In favorable climatic conditions lemon gives birth two times a year. Spring blossoming when you get the highest quality fruit lasts at least two months. Just as long ripe fruits can wait for harvesting, which means there may be uninterrupted harvesting throughout the winter from November to April or May. The second flourishing in the commercial plantations is forcibly, lasts from August to September. And the fruits are harvested in February, just after the winter harvest. One tree in favorable climatic conditions with all applied agrotechnical measures can give a yield of 600 to 800 fruits per year. Lemon is also perfect for growing in pot.

To plant lemon from seed, and get a beautiful decorative tree and an endless supply of lemons right at home, follow these instructions:

1. In a bowl of water, put the lemon seeds for 24 hours, then gently dry them. This procedure is not mandatory, but it is desirable to do so.
2. Carefully peel out the outer crust, so as not to damage the interior.
3. Lemon seeds, place them in a pot in the ground, at a depth of 1 cm. Then sprinkle it with some water. You can add small rocks over the ground.
4. Cover the pot with a plastic foil to prevent evaporation and not dry the soil quickly. Place the pot in a warm place, because the heat helps the lemon to grow.
5. When you notice small tin leaves, remove the plastic foil, occasionally water the plant, and once it has reached the appropriate height, plant it in a larger pot.

Tip Plus:
The lemon needs light and warm. Lemons are very sensitive to climate change. If you plant the fruit trees in the open, from the intense shift of light and temperature, fruits may even fall out of the leaves, as the result of a climate change may be the absence of fertility in the next year. Plant yourself and enjoy the taste of your lemons.

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lab test results

In the study, researchers tested 399 hospital patients and found that 14% had superbugs on their hands or nostrils right after admission. Superbugs were also found on items commonly touched by patients, such as the nurse call button, in nearly one-third of tests.

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Randi Vasquez was “always pretty chubby” growing up, but it never affected her confidence.

“I was always feeling myself,” the 27-year-old tells PEOPLE. “I wasn’t scared to wear a two-piece bathing suit or trendy outfits. I wasn’t always the happiest about my image, but I didn’t let that hold me back.”

But after she graduated from college, Vasquez found herself in “a post-grad slump.”

“I couldn’t find the job that I wanted, and I had trouble adapting,” she says.

RELATED: The Hidden Danger of Yo-Yo Dieting You Need to Know About

Living in Chattanooga, Tenn., she and her friends would go for hours-long, mimosa-filled brunches every weekend and dine on fried chicken and waffles. And her other meals were just as caloric — Vasquez relied on fast food and remembers one day when she and her roommate ate at the southern burger joint Krystal’s three times.

“I was getting heavier and heavier,” she says. “I started to notice that my confidence was going down, and I wasn’t motivated to do anything. It started to click that if I didn’t change my life that it would just get worse and worse.”

RELATED: This Woman Lost 185 Pounds In One Year By Cutting Back On Added Sugars and Carbs

Plus, Vasquez was struggling to do her job as a wedding photographer.

“I remember one proposal session on a mountain and I had to run up and down this trail,” she says. “I couldn’t keep up with the couple and I remember that day was a big moment because I felt so out of shape. I was so embarrassed because I was so exhausted.”

Vasquez decided to start trying to lose weight, but with small changes. She joined her local YMCA in the fall of 2014 and found a body pump class that she loved.

“I went twice a week — I became obsessed with it. Within five or six months I lost 18 to 20 lbs. just by going to the gym,” she says.

RELATED: Here’s How This Grandmother Lost 159 Lbs. at 56 Years Old

In March 2015, a friend introduced her to Kayla Itsines’ popular BBG plan, and she got a Fitbit Surge later that year to monitor her heart rate and figure out how to push herself during workouts.

“Within a few weeks my body started to change and that helped me stay motivated,” she says.

Vasquez also started cooking more of her meals and going for healthier options. She stuck to a low-carb diet as much as possible, but didn’t cut out fast food completely — “I didn’t want to restrict too many things,” she says. One of the biggest moments in her weight loss journey came when Itsines shared one of Vasquez’s progress photos on Instagram.

“That was one of the best moments for me, because it helped me break down a wall I had up,” she says. “Before I was heavy and I didn’t want anyone to know that I had gained weight after college and that I was struggling, but having that out in the world tore that wall down. It helped me share my story and meet other people like me who were tackling their weight problems.”

And slowly but surely, the weight started coming off.

“Year after year, month after month, I made small little goals and just kept going,” she says. “I hit 80 lbs. down in fall 2017. That was such a big moment for me. That was my original weight loss goal. I had these jars with marbles in them, and every time I lost a pound I would move a marble to the other jar. When I hit 80 lbs. down and moved that last marble it was such an amazing moment.”

In the year-and-a-half since, Vasquez has worked on maintaining her weight loss with a few ups and downs — she opened up to her now-72,800 Instagram followers in January that she was “constantly yo-yoing” in weight during 2018 and wanted to find a better balance. And in the months since, she accomplished one of her bucket list goals: running a half marathon.

“Before I even started losing weight, it was just something I really wanted to do,” she says. “I wanted to prove to myself that I can do something hard. Crossing that off my list was so awesome. It was such a good feeling knowing that the past few years have really changed me as I crossed that finish line.”

And overall, Vasquez just feels “much better.”

“I’m more motivated,” she says. “Losing weight makes you feel more motivated in all areas of your life. And I’m able to run around everywhere. Just this weekend I had a wedding and I was all over the place. I don’t feel like my weight can hold me back anymore. I was happy before but there was so much I was held back from that I didn’t even realize.”

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Outside of the classic soup, lentils are so infrequently used to their full potential. They are an ancient grain legume that was cooked frequently by our ancestors hundreds of years ago. And clearly they knew what they were doing, as lentils are loaded with protein, teeming with fiber, and shot through with a massive dose of antioxidants, these grains are a full-blown superfood. Sadly, lentils don’t get the best PR these days. They’re relegated to a food that few people cook, and even fewer restaurants serve. We think this is completely crazy, given how cheap, tasty, and easy to prepare they are. Plus, their health benefits are irreplaceable: lentils help to reduce cholesterol, they’re a great source of protein (and also vegetarian-friendly), they increase energy, and are good for your heart and digestive system. This is why we’ve decided to give lentils the good public relations they need! And now you see why our earliest ancestors ate them, right? Use this lentils recipe as a base for a side with grilled or roasted meats and fish (especially salmon). Want more flavor? Start with a hunk of bacon or a ham hock. Want to keep things vegetarian? Add in some roasted vegetables to make a heartier, nutrient-rich, lentil stew of sorts.

Nutrition:
160 calories, 4.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated), 540 mg sodium

Serves 6

You’ll Need

1 1⁄2 cups lentils
1 Tbsp olive oil
1⁄2 onion, chopped
2 carrots, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1⁄2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth or water
2 bay leaves
1⁄2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
Salt and black pepper to taste

How to Make It

  1. Rinse the lentils and pick through, discarding any stones.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a pot over medium heat.
  3. Cook the onion, carrots, and garlic until softened, 5 to 7 minutes.
  4. Add the lentils, broth, and bay leaves. Simmer until the lentils are just tender, about 20 minutes. Season with the vinegar, salt, and pepper. Discard the bay leaves.

Eat This Tip

Just like all of our recipes, we’ve tried to make this one versatile as possible so that you can add and subtract your own additions. Want to add some spice? Add some red pepper flakes or better yet, some curry.

Love this recipe? Subscribe to our Eat This, Not That! magazine for even more at-home cooking and healthy eating ideas.

The post A Nutrient-Packed Simmered Lentils Recipe appeared first on Eat This Not That.

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Outside of the classic soup, lentils are so infrequently used to their full potential. They are an ancient grain legume that was cooked frequently by our ancestors hundreds of years ago. And clearly they knew what they were doing, as lentils are loaded with protein, teeming with fiber, and shot through with a massive dose of antioxidants, these grains are a full-blown superfood. Sadly, lentils don’t get the best PR these days. They’re relegated to a food that few people cook, and even fewer restaurants serve. We think this is completely crazy, given how cheap, tasty, and easy to prepare they are. Plus, their health benefits are irreplaceable: lentils help to reduce cholesterol, they’re a great source of protein (and also vegetarian-friendly), they increase energy, and are good for your heart and digestive system. This is why we’ve decided to give lentils the good public relations they need! And now you see why our earliest ancestors ate them, right? Use this lentils recipe as a base for a side with grilled or roasted meats and fish (especially salmon). Want more flavor? Start with a hunk of bacon or a ham hock. Want to keep things vegetarian? Add in some roasted vegetables to make a heartier, nutrient-rich, lentil stew of sorts.

Nutrition:
160 calories, 4.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated), 540 mg sodium

Serves 6

You’ll Need

1 1⁄2 cups lentils
1 Tbsp olive oil
1⁄2 onion, chopped
2 carrots, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1⁄2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth or water
2 bay leaves
1⁄2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
Salt and black pepper to taste

How to Make It

  1. Rinse the lentils and pick through, discarding any stones.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a pot over medium heat.
  3. Cook the onion, carrots, and garlic until softened, 5 to 7 minutes.
  4. Add the lentils, broth, and bay leaves. Simmer until the lentils are just tender, about 20 minutes. Season with the vinegar, salt, and pepper. Discard the bay leaves.

Eat This Tip

Just like all of our recipes, we’ve tried to make this one versatile as possible so that you can add and subtract your own additions. Want to add some spice? Add some red pepper flakes or better yet, some curry.

Love this recipe? Subscribe to our Eat This, Not That! magazine for even more at-home cooking and healthy eating ideas.

The post A Nutrient-Packed Simmered Lentils Recipe appeared first on Eat This Not That.

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When it comes to eating healthy, the thing that can push us off track more often than not is our cravings for high caloric snacks overpowering us in-between meals. Snacks are more often than not loaded with fatty oils, phony flavoring and greasy, empty calories. We bet you can you guess what the biggest culprit is… Yep, if you guessed potato chips, you are correct. Nearly impossible to resist and more often than not potato chips come in near-bottomless bags that are equally impossible to put down, and before you know it you’ve consumed an entire meal’s worth of calories. A minuscule 1-ounce portion of potato chips will run you 160 calories and 10 grams of fat. But why should we have to avoid snacks entirely? But why can’t there be room in our healthy diets for snacks? You haven’t failed at eating healthy if you get hungry between meals, and when you’re hungry it is generally considered healthy to, well…eat. But, why settle when you can bake healthier and immensely tastier chips in 20 minutes at home? Customize their flavor depending on your mood.

Nutrition:
190 calories, 10 g fat (2 g saturated), 320 mg sodium

Serves 6

You’ll Need

2 large russet potatoes
1 Tbsp olive oil
Salt and black pepper to taste

OPTIONAL TOPPINGS

2 Tbsp finely grated Parmesan
1⁄2 Tbsp smoked paprika
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
1⁄4 cup chopped parsley and the grated zest of 1 lemon

How to Make It

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Scrub the potatoes with cold water and cut crosswise into 1⁄8″ thick slices.
  3. Toss with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper.
  4. Spread in a single layer on a baking sheet. (To use the optional toppings: Sprinkle with Parmesan, paprika, or rosemary before baking; add the parsley mixture after baking.)
  5. Bake until lightly browned and crispy, about 20 minutes.

Eat This Tip

Customize Your Chips:

You know we’re all about adapting recipes to suit your dietary restrictions, preference, moods, and tastebuds. So here are a few ideas of how to modify this recipe to suit your cravings and desires:

  • Switch from russet potatoes to sweet potatoes
  • Add in a few scallions for an oniony taste
  • Add in some hot pepper for an added bite

This recipe (and hundreds more!) came from one of our Cook This, Not That! books. For more easy cooking ideas, you can also buy the book!

The post The Best Homemade Potato Chips Recipe appeared first on Eat This Not That.

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